Descendents of Apache leaders exhibit their artwork in Deming

SWS Report | February, 2015 | Arts, Community Calendar


This basket print by Peggy Gooday is one of the pieces of art that will be on display at the Deming Art Center in April. Courtesy photo.

This basket print by Peggy Gooday is one of the pieces of art that will be on display at the Deming Art Center in April. Courtesy photo.

This century has seen many changes in our country and in the lives of the Apache population. The history of the American Southwest has pivoted around the wars waged between the United States Cavalry and the historic Apache leaders, Mangas Coloradas, Victorio, Cochise and Geronimo. At the end of these wars, Geronimo and his followers were transported first to Florida, then to Alabama and finally interned at Fort Sill, Oklahoma. In 1914, the survivors of this group were allowed to leave captivity. One of the first children born out of captivity was Allen Haozous (Houser), destined to become a world-renowned sculptor and fine artist. Over this last century, the Warm Springs/Chiricahua people have produced many fine artists.

The Deming Arts Council will host the first art exhibition exclusively featuring the work of descendants of Mangas Coloradas, Victorio, Cochise and Geronimo. This slice of history is overshadowed only by the quality of the art they produce.

After the release from captivity, many of the survivors drifted away from Oklahoma, settling all over the country, while others opted to remain in Oklahoma. The disbursement of population adds to the uniqueness of this exhibition, as artists will be traveling from Oklahoma, Louisiana, California, Santa Fe and Albuquerque. These artists will show print making, digital arts, paintings, installation art, sculpture, pottery, traditional bead work, fine jewelry and photography.

Allen Houser made Santa Fe his home and four generations of his family will be represented in the showing.

Peggy Gooday is one of eleven artists who will be participating in this exhibition. She is the great-great-great-granddaughter of Chief Mangas Colorados and Chief Loco who joined their bands together by marrying their children, Sethmooda and Bey-it-tsun. A print maker, Gooday is primarily interested in creating a Chiricahua Apache narrative and is currently working on a book of prints, The Apache Story Series. She is also interested in native basketry and symbolism, using these constructs throughout her work.

The artists will be present at the artist reception that will be held April 4, from 1 – 3 p.m., at the Deming Art Center, located at 100 S. Gold St., Deming. The exhibit will run from April 4 – 28.



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