Celebrate the arts in February at city museums

Woman with Flowers by Oscar Magallenes is part of the Graphicanos exhibit at the Branigan Cultural Center. Courtesy photo.
Woman with Flowers by Oscar Magallenes is part of the Graphicanos exhibit at the Branigan Cultural Center. Courtesy photo.
February is For the Love of Art Month in Las Cruces, an event founded by ArtForms Artists Association. The ArtForms annual member exhibition opens at the Branigan Cultural Center during the Downtown Ramble Friday, February 5, from 5 to 7 p.m. The exhibit is comprised of a wide range of art from paintings to photography and fractals. In addition, the Branigan will be hosting weekly performances celebrating the many forms of artistic expression in our community. Free programs will be offered each Saturday:
• Saturday, February 13, 1 p.m.: Borderlands Bones Trombone Quartet
• Saturday, February 20, 10 a.m.: Alma d’Arte Charter High School Choir
• Saturday, February 27, 1 p.m.: Sin Fronteras Poetry Reading

The museum is located at 501 North Main Street and is open Tuesday through Friday from 10 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. and Saturday, 9 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. For additional information, visit the website at las-cruces.org/museums or call 541-2154.

Graphicanos at Museum of Art
Graphicanos: Contemporary Latino Prints from the Serie Project opens Friday, February 5, in the Museum of Art. The opening reception is 5 – 7 p.m., during the Downtown Ramble. The exhibit, featuring works from the archives of the Fort Wayne Museum of Art, Fort Wayne, Texas, brings a variety of socio-political topics to the forefront. Serigraph prints by Latino artists explore cultural issues of the Latino community throughout the country. The exhibition continues through Saturday, April 2.

Mississippi #2 by Randy Hayes Rodney is part of the Reflections exhibit at the Las Cruces Museum of Art. Courtesy photo.
Mississippi #2 by Randy Hayes Rodney is part of the Reflections exhibit at the Las Cruces Museum of Art. Courtesy photo.
The Serie Project, a non-profit organization founded by Sam Coronado in 1993 in Austin, Texas, promotes the fine art of serigraphy. In the last two decades the organization has fostered over 250 artists from different professional levels and ethnic backgrounds, who together have produced a rare and special collection of serigraphs reflecting the Mexican American and Latino experience in the United States.

The Museum of Art is located on Main Street between the Branigan Cultural Center and the Museum of Nature and Science.

Reflections: African American Life at Branigan
The Branigan Cultural Center presents Reflections: African American Life from the Myrna Colley-Lee Collection. The exhibition will be on view at the Branigan Cultural Center from February 5 through April 2. An opening reception will be held Friday, February 5, from 5 to 7 p.m.

Reflections tells a story of community and place through a selection of paintings, photographs, textile pieces, and works on paper from the collection of renowned costume designer and arts patron, Myrna Colley-Lee. The imagery in Reflections focuses primarily on narrative works and landscapes of everyday life, past and present, and includes such noted artists as Elizabeth Catlett, Romare Bearden, Gwen Knight, Betye Saar, James Van Der Zee, and Eudora Welty. Thoughtfully co-curated by René Paul Barilleaux and Susan Lloyd McClamroch, and organized by International Arts & Artists, Reflections allows viewers to connect the strong tradition of storytelling by African Americans, with the sense of place that is largely unique to Southerners.

International Arts & Artists in Washington, DC, is a non-profit arts service organization dedicated to increasing cross-cultural understanding and exposure to the arts internationally through exhibitions, programs and services to artists, arts institutions and the public. Visit artsandartists.org.

The Visionarias at Branigan Cultural Center
The Branigan Cultural Center presents The Visionarias by Chris Carruth. The exhibit will be on display through Saturday, February 27. In this series of photographs, taken in early 2014 and 2015, Carruth documents the Visionaria Network’s ongoing development efforts in Cusco and the nearby Sacred Valley of Peru. The images portray multiple people, locations, and projects, elaborating on the organization’s work as well as its impact in communities. The Visionaria Network promises a sustainable, community-driven, participant-owned model of development work, and strives to create a network of confident women leaders who plan and implement development initiatives within their communities.