Museum exhibit shares history of NM Farm & Livestock Bureau

Will Pattison of Clovis
Will Pattison of Clovis (left) was an early organizer of the Curry County Farm Bureau, and also started the Curry County Fair in 1917. He is shown here with his family in a wheat field in the 1920s. Photo courtesy of the New Mexico Farm & Livestock Bureau.
The New Mexico Farm & Ranch Heritage Museum offers a variety of activities for all ages this month, including the popular HomeGrown food show and gift market on November 18 and 19.

New Exhibit: New Mexico Farm & Livestock Bureau: 100 Years Strong, Opening November 3

For a century, the New Mexico Farm & Livestock Bureau has been the voice of agriculture in New Mexico. The group (including the Doña Ana County Farm & Livestock Bureau that preceded it) has worked with elected and appointed officials to coordinate beneficial outcomes for New Mexico’s food producers. Soil conservation, better irrigation methods, and improved crop production were issues on the minds of the 300 farmers and ranchers in the Mesilla Valley who first gathered in 1917. This exhibit in the museum’s north corridor traces the history of the grass-roots organization, including its programs such as Ag in the Classroom, Women’s Leadership, Young Farmers & Ranchers, Farm Family of the Year, and insurance. The exhibit is on display through September 16, 2018.

Natural Dye Workshop, November 4, 9:30 a.m. to 4 p.m.

Museum volunteer Ric Rao will host this popular workshop that explores the uses and techniques of six different natural dyes. Rao, who has grown many of the dyes in his garden or harvested them locally, will work with participants using five fibers: alpaca, cotton, mohair, silk, and wool. The cost is $75 per person and reservations must be made by contacting Rao at 496-7678 or ricrao615@yahoo.com. Visitors to the museum may observe parts of the activity.

Culture Series: Driven by History: A Road Trip through our National Parks: November 9, 7 p.m.

In 2016 during the centenary of the National Park Service, Dr. Jon Hunner, who has taught in the History Department at New Mexico State University since 1995, drove more than 20,000 miles to visit more than 100 National Park sites and museums. During this free Culture Series presentation, he will share his experiences and images of this journey. Hunner has published several books, including most recently “Dr. J. Robert Oppenheimer, the Cold War, and the Atomic West.” He is also active in preserving nearby history and local heritage through his research and writing and by serving on many boards and committees in New Mexico, nationally, and internationally. In particular, he helped celebrate the centenary of New Mexico’s statehood in 2012. Before he became a historian, he hung art in museums, drove art around the country, waited tables, and in 1976, he juggled from Santa Fe to Albuquerque for the NM Arthritis Foundation.

Discovery Afternoon, Sheep and Wool: November 15, 1 to 3 p.m.

Meet a Navajo-Churro ewe from the flock, learn about her history, and work with her wool. Explore the history of sheep and of working with wool, while learning to card and weave. These Wednesday afternoon classes were developed with home school students and their parents in mind, but are open to all children. Recommended for ages five to 10. The fee is $3 per child/parent. Space is limited, so reserve your spot by calling LuAnn Kilday at 522-4100.

HomeGrown, A New Mexico Food Show & Gift Market: November 18, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. and November 19, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.

Food grown in New Mexico is showcased at this fourth-annual event. More than 60 vendors from around the state will sell their products as the giftgiving season approaches. Food items offered for sampling and purchasing include award-winning salsas, wine, pies, cookies, sauces, honey, jerky, candy, cheese, tortillas, and more. New Mexico crafts are also part of the event. The museum is partnering with the New Mexico Department of Agriculture and the state’s growers to offer great products to sample and buy. The NMDA food demonstration trailer will have free samples of New Mexico treats. Admission is $5 per vehicle and the first 100 vehicles each day receive a free burlap shopping bag.

Discovery Afternoon:, The Amazing Honey Bee: November 29, 1 to 3 p.m.

Do you know that honey bees are an important part of our lives? Honey bees pollinate the crops we love to eat. In this program, students will learn about the honey bee and why they are so important. Students will identify different parts of a bee’s anatomy, and learn about pollination and the life cycle of the bee. These Wednesday afternoon classes were developed with home school students and their parents in mind, but are open to all children. Recommended for ages five to 10. The fee is $3 per child/parent. Space is limited, so reserve your spot by calling LuAnn Kilday at 522-4100.

The museum is located at 4100 Dripping Springs Road. Hours are 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., Monday through Saturday, and noon to 5 p.m. on Sunday. Admission is $5 for adults, $4 for senior citizens, $3 for children ages four to 17, and $2 for active U.S. military members and veterans. Children three and under, and members of the Museum Friends receive free admission. For more information, call 522-4100 or go to nmfarmandranchmuseum.org.